Walking trails

Walking for everyone

Grab your walking boots and enjoy a day out in the great outdoors.  Discover nature reserves, woods, parks, coastal villages, and countryside tracks. 

North East Lincolnshire has wonderful walks to choose from including strolls through our various parks, woodland trails and beachfront danders.

We have longer routes such as the 20 mile circular walk ‘The Wanderlust Way’ will take you through field edge paths, tracks and minor roads meandering through the Lincolnshire Wolds.  The 25 mile ‘Johnson Silver Lincs Way’, a staged walk from Grimsby to Louth is a lovely walk through scenic villages and areas of outstanding beauty. 

Shorter walks include the challenging route ‘Wold Newton Circular’ walk which is a 6 mile ramble in the countryside, on a clear day you will see outstanding views of the country and coast during this walk.  

For those that prefer a gentle amble try our coastal path which is a family favourite as well as being ideal for dog walkers.  

There’s walking trails for all sorts of abilities available to download below. Copies of each leaflet can be picked up from your local library or from the Cycle Hubs at Grimsby Town and Cleethorpes railway stations.  

Walking Routes

Suitability – Suitable for walkers with dogs
Distance – 5.25 miles (8.5 km)
Difficulty – Challenging

This is a great walk to get out and discover the countryside right on your doorstep. The walk starts in the picturesque Bradley Woods, easily accessible off Bradley Road. There is ample car parking at the start.

During the middle ages Bradley Woods and nearby Dixon Woods were favourite haunts for the Mayor of Grimsby and the Burgess where they would hunt for boar. At the time, the woods would have covered a much greater acreage than today and the noblemen would have raced up and down the ‘rides’ chasing boar. The people of Bradley used to supply the boar for the Mayor’s banquets and this is reflected in the coat of arms of Grimsby.

Roughly halfway around the walk, you’ll come to the village of Barnoldby-le-Beck, passing St Helen’s Church. Now a Grade I listed building, over the years the Norman structure has been significantly restored and renovated. Small parts of the original building still remain as do examples of medieval glass in the church windows.

Walkers can stop off at The Ship Inn for a drink and something to eat. On leaving Barnoldby you head north along the network of footpaths and bridleways passing Laceby Manor Golf Course before heading back through the woods to complete your walk.

The route:

  1. From the car park continue along the road into the woods passing alongside the green metal gates
  2. At the playing area turn left along the bridleway and continue out of the woods along the field edge
  3. Ignore the path on the right and continue straight ahead
  4. Ignore the path on the left and continue straight ahead through the metal barrier
  5. As you cross the drain the path turns sharp right then immediately left. Ignore the path off to the right and follow the waymarker south to Barnoldby
  6. You may spot rare breed sheep at Glebe Farm
  7. Follow the track into the village passing the Obelisk and continuing straight ahead. Take care along the road to meet with the busy Main Road
  8. Turn right onto Main Road. Refreshments may be available at The Ship Inn public house
  9. Turn right at the Footpath sign post and follow the track north towards and through woodland
  10. On emerging from the woodland look out for the waymarker at the stone track indicating the path north across an arable field to a bridge
  11. Cross the bridge and follow the direction of the waymarker across the arable field
  12. At the junction with the stone track turn right following the direction of the waymarker alongside the golf course
  13. At the first 3 way signpost continue straight ahead taking care through the farm yard
  14. At the second 3 way signpost turn right along the tarmac road Ignore the path on the right and the left
  15. Look out for a path crossing the tarmac road with 2 way sign posts either side of the road. Turn right here and continue along the ditch side
  16. Cross the bridge and continue along the ditch side
  17. Turn right at the junction with the track and head towards the woods then turn left at the waymarker following the outer edge of the woods
  18. Turn right at the 3 way sign post into the woods and back to the start

Suitability – Accessible by public transport. Suitable for wheelchair users. Suitable for walkers with dogs
Distance – 2.25 miles (3.5 km)
Difficulty – Easy

An oasis in the middle of town, Cleethorpes Country Park was established in 1988 and covers an area of over 64 hectares of open grazing pasture, woodlands and a large lake with abundant wildlife and waterfowl.

Within the Country Park there are a variety of walks to choose from, the easiest and most accessible is a stroll around the lake on the tarmac path. This route is idea for anyone looking to get a bit of light exercise or anyone with mobility impairments. Look out for the displays around the lake for more information about these walks.

There are several accesses into the park for pedestrians, motorists can access the area via Park Lane (just off Humberston Road and North Sea Lane), there is a large car park with a picnic area and toilet facilities. Bus services, No 7,8,9 or 10 all stop close to the park making the walk easy to get to from all over Grimsby and Cleethorpes.

As well as being a great place for a walk the park also has areas dedicated to fishing, pond dipping, boating and there’s even a dedicated area for dogs to swim in. After your walk why not pop along to Cleethorpes Seafront where you’ll find a host of places to eat, drink and relax.

The route:

  1. Leave the car park by the southeast exit and head up the path towards the lake
  2. At the first junction take the path to your right
  3. Follow the path straight ahead towards the bridge
  4. Before crossing the narrow footbridge turn left and follow the track keeping the beck to your right hand side
  5. Turn left onto Grimsby Road
  6. At Martin Wragg Way turn left and re-enter the parkland, follow the path heading towards the lake
  7. In the small wooded area follow the path straight ahead
  8. At the circular blocked paved area turn right and head back towards the car park

This is just one of the walks around the Country Park, look out for more walks on the display board by the car park

Suitability – Accessible by public transport. Suitable for walkers with dogs
Distance – 4.5 miles (7 km)
Difficulty – Steady

Enjoy this walk along the seafront in Cleethorpes. The route begins at the Discovery Centre at the Boating Lake and takes you past Pleasure Island and through Humberston Fitties before taking you along the edge of the beach back to the Boating Lake.

There is ample parking in the Thrunscoe Land car park adjacent to the start of the walk and bus services from all around Grimsby & Cleethorpes stop on Kingsway close to the start of the route.

On leaving the Boating Lake you will be heading past the Meridian Arena and Pleasure Island before entering the Humberston Fitties which during the WWI was used to house soldiers stationed at the nearby Haile Sand Fort built in the war to protect the Humber Ports from sea attack. The Fitties are now part of a local nature reserve and home to over 300 holiday chalets.

As you leave the Fitties behind you’ll soon notice a signpost with arms pointing to all parts of the globe. This is the line of zero degrees longitude where east meets west. As well as Cleethorpes the line also passes through France and Spain in Europe as well as Algeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Togo and Ghana in Africa.

At the end of the walk you can either stop off at the Signal Box Inn at the Light Railway or go back to the Discovery Centre for some refreshments. If you’ve still got some energy left why not hire a boat and go for a row or a pedal around the lake?

The route:

  1. Leave the Discovery Centre and take the path alongside the Boating Lake
  2. Take the right hand fork in the path away from the edge of the Boating Lake
  3. At the T junction turn left and follow the path passing the The Jungle Zoo
  4. Follow the path which bends to the right passing over a boardwalk to the Cleethorpes Coast Light Railway station
  5. Pass by the Railway Station and continue along the path crossing Meridian Road Continue straight ahead at the
    roundabout towards Thorpe Park Ignore the road to the right and continue towards Thorpe Park
  6. Continue straight ahead at the roundabout
  7. Take care crossing the road to follow the footpath indicated by the signpost along the top of the drain bank
  8. Cross the bridge and follow the direction of the waymarkers between the chalets
  9. Continue following the waymarkers and signposts through the caravan park
  10. Cross over the bridge and turn left alongside the lake
  11. Cross the car park and pass through the sand dunes turning left along a sandy path
  12. Continue straight ahead along the tarmac path
  13. Just after the small chalets turn left along Meridian Road back towards the Boating Lake

Notes – Accessible by public transport. Walkers may encounter livestock
Distance – 7.5 miles (12 km)
Difficulty – Steady

This delightful walk takes you on a tour of four local churches in the villages of Waltham, Brigsley, Ashby-cum-Fenby and Barnoldby-le-Beck. The walk is accessible by public transport that runs from Cleethorpes and Grimsby.

The first of the four churches is All Saints in Waltham. A Grade II listed building, the 13th century medieval church was restored by James Fowler of Louth in the 1800s. Waltham is a thriving village with a good range of local services and places to eat and relax. If you have the opportunity, do visit Waltham Windmill. The Museum of Rural Life is also located here, featuring many exhibits from the 1930s & 1940s and the RAF Grimsby exhibition. Also on site is a miniature railway, shops, a café and a restaurant.

Brigsley church is dedicated to St Helen believed to be a 4th Century Welsh saint. The earliest parts of the church date back to the 11th Century with later additions. Substantial changes were made to the structure during the 18th, 19th and 20th Centuries although the building retains its square Norman tower.

St Peter’s Church in Ashby dates from a similar period to St Helen’s in Brigsley, the church was classified as a Grade 2 listed building in 1967 in acknowledgement of its striking architecture and early English tower, aisle and belfry.

The Parish Church in Barnoldby-le-Beck shares the same name as that in Brigsley, being dedicated to St Helen. The church has been significantly restored and renovated over the ages, small parts of the original Norman structure still remain as does examples of Medieval glass in the church windows. The church is now recognised as a Grade 1 listed building.

The route:

  1. Leaving All Saints church on High Street Waltham turn into Kirkgate and follow this to the junction with Cheapside.
  2. At Cheapside turn left and follow this for approx. 300m.
  3. Turn right at the signpost indicating a footpath alongside no. 58 Cheapside.
  4. Pass through two gates and continue along the field edge turning right at the waymarker indicating the footpath through the Windmill site.
  5. Continue through the site, taking care across the car park and along the entrance road and then turn left onto Brigsley Road .
  6. Continue along Brigsley Road for approx. 500m then follow the direction of the signpost indicating a footpath along the rear of houses on Brigsley Road.
  7. The path emerges onto Waltham Road. Turn left here along Waltham Road.
  8. At the bend in the road at the junction with Green Lane/Church Lane continue straight ahead along Church Lane.
  9. At the junction with Waithe Lane turn right and follow this for approx. 80m to a signpost on your left side.
  10. Turn left at the signpost indicating the footpath through the metal gate and along an enclosed tarmac path.
  11. Cross the bridge and immediately turn left. DO NOT PASS THROUGH THE KISSING GATE. Follow the waymarkers across arable land to another bridge.
  12. Cross the bridge and continue straight ahead along a grassy track to a gate.
  13. Pass through the gate and continue straight ahead along a stony track.
  14. At the elevated metal tank at the bend in the track, follow the direction of the waymarker straight ahead along a grass track. DO NOT continue along the stone track which bends to the left.
  15. Continue to the end of the grass track to a bridge on your right side. Cross the bridge and continue across an arable field back towards Ashby. On re-joining the field edge turn left along the grass track towards the road.
  16. Turn right at the road and follow this through the village to the sharp bend in the road.
  17. Turn right at the sharp bend in the road along the access road to St. Peters church.
  18. Leave the church and head back to the road and turn right. Continue to a signpost on your right side.
  19. Turn right at the signpost indicating the footpath along the edge of a cattle field. (NB if you do not want to walk amongst the cattle continue along Ashby Lane turning right at the T junction taking care along the busy road).
  20. After approx. 200m look out for a waymarker indicating the footpath across the field. Follow the direction of the waymarker across the field to a gate at the roadside.
  21. Pass through the kissing gate and turn right taking care along the verge on Main Road.
  22. Turn left following the directions of the footpath signpost through a stable yard. Pass through several gates along an enclosed path and along the edge of woodland.
  23. On emerging from the woodland continue straight ahead along the field edge.
  24. Follow the direction of the waymarkers turning right then left along the field edge and on into woodland.
  25. On emerging from the woodland follow the direction of the signpost along the fence line. Continue through two kissing gates to emerge onto Main Road Barnoldby.
  26. At Main Road take care crossing the road and turn down Church Lane to St Helens church.
  27. Turn left out of the church yard along Church Lane and follow the road bending to the right along Chapel Lane.
  28. Turn left down Old Main Road and follow this to the junction with Main Road.
  29. Turn left at Main Road and follow the footway alongside the road back to Waltham.
  30. Take care as you cross the road at the mini roundabout continuing straight ahead along Barnoldby Road. Cross another mini roundabout and continue on to the junction with High Street.
  31. Turn left along High Street and back to the start.

Notes – Accessible by public transport. Walkers may encounter livestock
Distance – 5 miles (8 km)
Difficulty – Challenging

This circular walk starts at Healing railway station. There is no car park at the station but on street parking is available through the village. Please park with respect to local villagers and other motorists.

The walk takes you out of Healing village and across the extensive network of local footpaths and bridleways to the neighbouring village of Stallingborough and back.

Walking south out of the village you will pass Healing Manor Hotel, the former manor house. Do pop in for a drink or a bite to eat on the way back. Next to the hotel is Healing’s Grade II listed church. Originating in the 13th century, the church is dedicated to St Peter and St Paul. The upper parts of the tower are in decorated style and ashlar faced. After falling into disrepair, much of the structure was rebuilt in the 19th century thanks to money from local landowners.

Crossing the main road on the public footpath, the walk takes you through to Stallingborough. During the medieval period, Stallingborough was the third largest settlement in northern Lincolnshire after Barton and Grimsby and in the 1500s it hosted a market and a fair.

After walking down the main road of Stallingborough (passing the Green Man pub, another great spot for food and drink), the remainder of the walk takes you along the footpaths back to Healing and overlooks the busy A180 to the Humber Bank industries that provide the area with employment and wealth.

The route:

  1. Leave the station and head south along Station Road to the mini roundabout
  2. At the mini roundabout turn left along Low Road and continue to the junction with Stallingborough Road
  3. Turn right at Stallingborough Road and look out for a signpost on your left
  4. Follow the well-trodden route through the wood and across a grass field to some outbuildings
  5. At the outbuildings turn left following the way markers indicating the path towards open countryside
  6. Follow the way markers indicating the path across an arable field and along a field edge to Aylesby Lane
  7. Turn right onto Aylesby Lane and follow this to the very end where the path passes through a hedge line
  8. Pass through the hedge line and turn right along the field edge to a 3 way sign post at a bridge
  9. Turn right at the 3 way signpost indicating a footpath over the bridge and across an arable field towards woodland
  10. Take the path across the field to the edge of a wood and then follow the direction of the way markers along the field edge around the edge of the wood to a bridge and gate
  11. Cross the bridge and pass through the gate following the direction of the way markers across grazing land
  12. Follow the trodden route across the grazing land passing a 2 way signpost and continue to a gate and bridge
  13. Pass through the gate and cross the bridge following the direction of the way markers across grassland towards woodland
  14. Follow the well-trodden route through the narrow woods emerging onto a field edge path
  15. Continue along the field edge path at the rear of properties and turn right at the end of the garden fence line through woodland to emerge onto Stallingborough Road
  16. Turn left at the road and after approx. 30m take care crossing the road and look out for the sign post indicating a footpath
    alongside 18a Stallingborough Road down a stone track
  17. Follow the stone track and turn left at the way markers indicating a path between wire fencing and a tall hedgerow Please note, the path is quite narrow for a short distance
  18. Continue along this narrow path taking care when crossing Cornflower Close and Wisteria Drive and continue over a bridge
    to a second bridge beyond the new housing development
  19. Cross the bridge and immediately turn right. Follow the field edge path for approx. 90m and then turn left at the way marker post indicating the path towards Stallingborough. Continue along the grassy path which eventually changes to tarmac and emerges onto Ayscough Avenue at Stallingborough
  20. Continue straight ahead along Ayscough Avenue to the junction with Station Road and turn right here
  21. Continue along Station Road through the village and turn right onto Carr Lane. Follow the tarmac road which eventually changes to a grassy track
  22. Follow the way markers along the field edge path
  23. The path passes over a wide drain. Turn right here and continue along the path with a deep drain either side
  24. Cross over a big concrete bridge and turn immediately right to follow the field edge path towards Healing
  25. Cross over two more wooden bridges and follow the way markers indicating the path that eventually emerges onto Station Road

Notes – Accessible by public transport. Suitable for walkers with dogs
Distance – 2.5 miles (4 km)
Difficulty – Steady

This is an ideal walk if you work on the Europarc business park and fancy getting out from behind your desk at lunchtime or after work.

The walk starts outside the Innovation Centre and is accessible by public transport via the No 1 or 2 service from the centre of Grimsby. There is plenty of parking either at the Innovation Centre itself or on the streets around the area.

The walk meanders between the plethora of industries along the Humber bank with a half way stop on the seawall where you’ll be able to see many of the industries which thrive in the local area along with the wildlife that live alongside them.

The walk crosses the railway on its way to and from the estuary so please take extra care crossing with children and pets.

Should you be in need of some refreshments you might want to visit Fresco Café’ situated on Origin Way for a coffee and a cake. There is also the opportunity to stop off at The Beechwood Farm Dining & Carvery on Village Way, for a drink and something to eat.

The route:

  1. Starting at Genesis Way follow the grassy path alongside the Innovation Centre
  2. Turn left to follow the direction of the waymarker alongside the drain
  3. Turn right and cross over the footbridge and through a gate then take care crossing the pipe line and railway line before passing through another gate and on towards the road
  4. Take care crossing the road and continue straight ahead to a footbridge
  5. Cross the footbridge and continue straight ahead across an arable field
  6. Turn right following the direction of the waymarker along the drain side
  7. Follow the waymarkers turning left over the drain and then immediately right along the stone track
  8. At the 3 way signpost turn left along the tarmac road towards the seawall
  9. Take time out to enjoy the views across the River Humber before returning back along the tarmac road
  10. On the return journey ignore the path on the right and continue straight ahead along the tarmac road
  11. Continue straight ahead along Woad Lane
  12. Turn right and continue along Laforey Road to the footbridge at the end of the road
  13. Cross over the footbridge and continue along Genesis Way to the start of the walk

Notes – Accessible by public transport. Suitable for walkers with dogs
Distance – 7 miles (11 km)
Difficulty – Steady

This seven-mile circular walk takes you around the village of Laceby providing many picturesque views of Laceby Beck and the foothills of the Lincolnshire Wolds.

After starting your walk in the village square you will pass the church of St Margaret’s, parts of which date back to the 12th century. Next, you’ll pass the old village schoolhouse which was established in the 1730s thanks to funds left by Philip and Sarah Stanford who’s three children died in infancy. Although the current school has moved to a new site along Cooper Lane, it still retains the Stanford name. Additionally, the Stanford Trust is still active, providing additional educational facilities at the school and the nearby Stanford Centre for residents of the village.

Whilst this route is mostly away from roads, it does cross the main A46 into Grimsby so please be careful whilst crossing and where possible, use recognised crossing points.

Laceby is listed in the 1086 Doomsday Book as ‘Lenesbi’ or ‘Levesbi’. The three Lords at the time were Erik, Tosti and Swein and the land belonged to Bishop Odo of Bayeux, as lord of the manor and tenant-in-chief. The walk also takes you through Bradley Woods before taking you back to the village. Keep a look out for the Kingfishers on Laceby Beck as you walk nearby.

Once back in the village square why not visit The Little Teapot Tearooms for some well earned tea and cake.

The route:

  1. Leave the village square along High Street passing the Church on your right hand side
  2. Take the second turning on your right along New Chapel Lane then the second turning on your left along Austin Garth
  3. Pass through a metal kissing gate and continue straight on along the edge of open grassland
  4. At the waymarker post take the right hand fork and follow the well trodden route to a foot bridge
  5. Cross the bridge and follow the direction of the waymarker diagonally across the grass field to a waymarker post
  6. At the waymarker post at the junction with a grass track turn right following the direction of the waymarker along the field edge
  7. Keep to the field edge path which takes a sharp turn right
  8. Pass by a pretty pond on your right hand side
  9. Follow the edge of Laceby Beck then turn right over the big iron bridge and follow the stone track
  10. Continue along the stone track turning sharp right then continue straight on to the road
  11. Take care crossing over the busy dual carriageway of the A46, then turn left along the access road and right into Cottagers Plot
  12. At the end of Cottagers Plot turn left then right following the direction of the waymarker across the arable field
  13. Ignore the path on the left
  14. Ignore the path on your right
  15. Turn left following the direction of the waymarker along the outer edge of the woods
  16. At the 3 way sign post turn right into Bradley Woods and continue along the path to the playing area. Half Way Point (approx.)
  17. Pass by the playing area and continue along the path to the edge of the woods
  18. From the edge of the woods continue straight ahead along the field edge
  19. Turn right at the waymarker along the stone track
  20. Follow the waymarkers turning right then left to follow the path across the arable field
  21. Cross over the bridge and turn right
  22. Turn left at the waymarker along the field edge
  23. Turn left at the tarmac road and continue to Manor Top Farm
  24. At the 3 way sign post turn left taking care as you pass through the farm yard
  25. At another 3 way sign post turn right and follow the road through the golf course
  26. Look out for Kingfishers patrolling Laceby Beck
  27. Ignore the path on your right
  28. At the 3 way signpost turn right along a grassy track
  29. Ignore the path on your left
  30. Ignore the paths to your right and left
  31. Take care crossing over the busy dual carriageway of the A46

Notes – Accessible by public transport. Suitable for walkers with dogs
Distance – 2.25 miles (3.5 km)
Difficulty – Steady

Discover the countryside in this 2¼-mile wander to the north of Immingham taking in the privately owned Mayflower Woods. The 120 acres of planted woodland is owned by the Humber Refinery of Phillips 66. Humber Refinery of Phillips 66 open via Permissive rights of way.

Immingham has existed as small settlement since the early medieval period. The town was mentioned in the Doomsday Book, recorded as Imungeham. Its Anglo-Saxon name is thought to mean the ‘homestead of the people of Imma’. Up until the 1900s it was a rural hamlet, made up of farms and cottages and was surrounded by marshland. Today, Immingham is the largest port by tonnage the UK.

This walk starts at St Andrew’s church which dates back to the early medieval period with much of the structure dating to the 13th century. Sited on some of the highest ground of the port and town, the 500-year-old tower commands a good view of the town and countryside. See if you can spot the gargoyle on the bell tower who points its naked backside towards Killingholme!

Immingham was the last departure point for the Pilgrim Separatists who fled England in 1608 for Holland. These individuals later boarded the Mayflower ship for the new world and founded one of the first English colonies in America. It was on the shores of Immingham that a group of people gathered to travel to Holland. Across from St Andrew’s church you can also visit the Pilgrim’s Monument.

Once you have walked the length of Mill Lane, the route follows well established local footpaths and goes through Mayflower Woods emerging onto the old golf course and back to the church.

After your walk you can enjoy some refreshments in the town centre and perhaps pop into the museum to learn more about the town’s heritage.

The route:

  1. Leave the Church following Church Lane for a short distance then turn down Mill Lane continue along the lane walking past Immingham Parish Cemetery on the right
  2. At the sharp bend turn right following the direction of the footpath sign along a stony track which eventually changes
    to a grassy field edge path
  3. Cross the bridge and continue straight ahead along the well trodden path
  4. At the big drain turn right following the direction of the waymarkers along the path with the drain on your left side
  5. Pass through a kissing gate and continue along the path along the drain side
  6. Pass through two more kissing gates close together and continue along the well trodden route through the woodland
  7. Cross the bridge and immediately turn left along the drain side
  8. Turn right along the edge of the trees across the golf course back to the car park
  9. Cross the car park and follow the path around the church back to the start

Notes – Accessible by public transport. Suitable for walkers with dogs. Suitable for wheelchair users
Distance – 1 miles (1.5 km)
Difficulty – Easy

Weelsby Woods is a large public park in Grimsby with mature trees, woodland and grassy areas. It is great for family walks with a choice of paths through the woodland area and large open spaces to enjoy a game of football or lay out a picnic. Some of the untended areas of parkland have an abundance of birds, small mammals and foxes.

Donated to the Borough of Grimsby in 1950, the land was once the grounds of Weelsby Villa. Victorian maps of the area display a manor house, villa plantation, a pheasantry and a large pond.

During the First World War the Woods were used as a training ground for locally recruited soldiers. In World War II, the Woods became home to an Italian Prisoner of War camp and was used to house sections of the Polish Army, the Carpathian Lancers Regiment. Many of these soldiers remained in Grimsby after the war, contributing to the town’s Polish community. Free parking is available on site.

On entering Weelsby Woods park you’ll be greeted by two large lion statues. The lions were once located in a private residence in Abbey Road until they were donated to the council in 1948. They are much loved by the residents of the town and are an iconic symbol of Weelsby Woods.

The route:

  1. With your back to the café start walking to the right towards the smaller playground area
  2. At the main track turn left taking care when walking through the car park area
  3. After around 450m the path forks into two, take the left hand path into the wooded area
  4. Keep walking straight ahead where this path joins two others
  5. Keep to this path, do not turn left here. Exit the woods and walk down the slope towards the larger playground area
  6. At this junction turn right and head back towards the café

Notes – Walkers may encounter livestock
Distance – 6 miles (9.5 km)
Difficulty – Challenging

The Lincolnshire Wolds provides views across the flat fens and salt marshes of Lindsey and Holland. On a clear day, you’ll be able to see outstanding views of the country and coast from this walk. Look out for Grimsby’s Dock Tower to the north, the wind turbines off the coast at Mablethorpe to the east and Tattershall Castle to the south west.

Man has shaped and influenced the landscape that we see today, and the archaeology of the area is nationally important. In medieval times the area was densely populated and evidence of this can be seen under your feet. Many of these settlements were eventually abandoned because of changes to farming methods, famine and The Black Death. Today, farming remains a key local industry with over 80% of the AONB currently being cultivated in a range of crops.

There are no facilities along the route so remember to take a drink and a pack-up with you. After you’ve completed the walk, you could stop to relax at Hall Farm Hotel and Restaurant or the Clickem Inn, off the B1203 near Swinhope.

The route:

  1. Head north from the Bridleway signpost opposite North Farm. Follow the path alongside a copse and across arable land to
    the edge of a pit
  2. Follow the waymarkers around the edge of the pit and across arable land turning left at the waymarker at the field edge
  3. Turn right at the stone track then left following the waymarkers
  4. Ignore the path on the left and continue straight ahead through the woods then turn right following the field edge
  5. Turn right at the 3 way sign post before reaching the A18 Barton Street
  6. Enjoy a rest at the bench and take in the sea views. Also spot the old horsedrawn waggons in the barn as you pass by
  7. Take care crossing the road then follow the direction of the bridleway sign across arable land to pick up the field edge path
  8. Turn left at the 3 way signpost then after approx. 100m turn right at another 3 way signpost. Half Way Point (approx.)
  9. At the waymarker post ignore the path on the right and continue straight ahead along the field edge turning sharp left onto a stone track
  10. Look out for the waymarker post in the hedge line and turn right here
  11. At the woods turn right along the outer edge of the woods
  12. Pass through a gate and drop down the hill through a second gate then turn right keeping to the field edge
  13. Continue through two further gates before following the path through the woods
  14. At the road turn right and take care following the road into the village
  15. Turn left at the Footpath signpost into South Farm and take care following the path through the farmyard and onto a stone track
  16. Continue straight ahead where the stone track changes to a grassy path
  17. Pass through a wooden gate alongside the pretty Church and continue across grazing land
  18. At the 3 way sign post continue straight ahead
  19. Pass through another wooden gate and take care crossing the farmyard before passing through an iron gate onto the road and back to the start